Respiratory Protection

Respiratory Protection is in the highest class for personal protective equipment. The air we breathe must be as clean as possible. Even the smallest dust particles can cause considerable damage. Think of the danger of asbestos. Furthermore gases and vapours in the environment are serious risks to health. If insufficient measures are taken, acute poisoning can occur in the short term and a serious disease in the long run. The presence of hazardous substances in the air is therefore seen as a big risk. That is why all respiratory protection products are classified in the PPE-class 3, the class with the greatest risk.

The three PPE-categories

 

Category 1:

· Low risk

· CE self-certification

Category 2:

· Serious risk;

· Certification by a competent organization

· High risk;

Category 3:

· Certification by a competent organization

· Quality Assurance

· Required maintenance, and training

 

Most important standards for respiratory protection

 

Disposable masks

1 EN 149: maintenance-free dust masks with protection against particles in 3 protection classes: FFP1, FFP2 and FFP3. On August 1, 2010, an amendment of EN 149.2001 standard entered into force with respect to reuse of the dust filter R(reusable) or NR(non reusable), tag EN 149:2001+A1:2009.

2 EN 405: filtering half face masks of the one-piece with valves for protection against gases and particles.

 

Reusable masks.

1 EN 140: reusable half- and quarter face masks, for use with filters and devices for respiratory protection.

2 EN 136: full face respirators for use with filters and devices for respiratory protection.

3 EN 148: threads. This standard describes the different connection types between the PPE and filters in regards to the masks. The most common standard is EN 148-1 which is described by thread Rd40 x 1/7".

4 EN 143: particulate filters for respiratory protection equipment with negative pressure. These should provide effective protection against dust and fibres, most types of smoke, and also, for example bacteria. For half face masks complying with EN 140 or 136 full face masks. 3 Classes: P1: Low Filtration, P2: Medium filtration and P3: High filtration.

5 EN 14387: gas/vapour filters. Combined filters for respiratory protection equipment with negative pressure. These filters are classified according to their type and class (see table gas filter classes). 3 categories correspond with the different capacities and maximum permitted concentration toxins in contaminated air category 1: 0.1 %, category 2: 0.5 %, category 3: 1%.

6 EN 371 or EN 14387 AX: gas- and combined filters against organic compounds with low boiling point. (< 65 °C). These patterns are intended for single use only.

 

Engine Units

1 EN 12941 (formerly EN 146): filtering equipment with engine units for helmets or air caps against particles, gases and vapours. 3 categories for all equipment: TH1, TH2 and TH3.

2) EN 12942 (formerly EN 147): filtering equipment with engine units for full-, half- or quart face masks against particles, gases and vapours. 3 protective categories: TM1, TM2 and TM3.

 

Equipment with air supply and seal

EN 14594 (replaces EN1835, EN12419, EN270 and EN139): breathing equipment with continuous flow of compressed air through air pipe - with half mask, complete mask, loose visors and air caps - the standard includes four classes and each class is available in light and heavy-duty version.

Breathing equipment

1 EN 137: breathing equipment with compressed air, open circuit.

2 EN 145: breathing machines with closed circuit and compressed air with oxygen or compressed air with oxygen nitrogen.

3 EN 1146: evacuation devices, open circuit sealed breathing equipment with compressed air in air cover.

4 EN 402: evacuation devices, open circuit, sealed breathing equipment with compressed air and full masks or nozzle.

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